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Are You Asking the Right Questions?


Albert Einstein said, "If I were given one hour to save the planet, I would spend 59 minutes defining the problem and one minute resolving it.”
Albert Einstein said, "If I were given one hour to save the planet, I would spend 59 minutes defining the problem and one minute resolving it.”

In our productivity focused culture, we aim to either seek out or, even better, be the person with all of the answers. The faster we can resolve an issue, the better. The desire for a quick resolution to a relationship issue, a personal struggle, a discomforting truth, or a shift in direction has become the norm. Yet, the need to "check off" the problem, to put a pin in it and move on, for no other reason than to alleviate the emotional dysregulation that plagues us, oftentimes delays the peace and growth we desire.


Albert Einstein said, "If I were given one hour to save the planet, I would spend 59 minutes defining the problem and one minute resolving it.” Ironically, most of us were never shown the power in asking the right questions in order to find clarity. Taking the time to really understand a problem or struggle through explorative questions can make the actual implementation and resolution easier. For example, if you continuously overspend, perhaps the question isn't Why can't I save money? The more clarifying question could be Do I truly believe I can manage my own financial health? If your answer is no, I do not feel competent with my finances, then you can take action steps such as speaking to a trusted friend, a financial advisor, or a therapist to explore money wounds you might have from childhood.


Jena Young joined The Ego Project to share the ego work she has done in her life, especially in her role as a leader. In this clip, she explains how her personal work is fueled with curiosity and asking herself explorative questions, which lead to healing.

You can listen to Jena's full podcast episode here.


Getting curious about yourself and asking questions can be a rewarding place to begin a healing journey. It's important to remember that the process is to learn not to judge. If you find yourself criticizing what you learn, take a step back and try again. Approaching the process in the same manner you would with a respected friend is key.


Using the topic of money beliefs as a template for self-inquiry, here are questions you can ask yourself for deeper insight:


What are my money beliefs:

  1. What did I learn about money in my childhood? There's never enough? You have to work yourself to the bone to earn it? Those with money are "better" than those without?

  2. What does money mean to me? Security? Freedom? Superiority? Inferiority?

  3. When I think about money, how do I feel in my body? Anxious? Fearful? Angry?

  4. What do those emotions remind me of? An experience in childhood? A critical parent, teacher, or boss? The answer might surprise you!

  5. Deep down, how much money do I truly feel I deserve?

  6. Allow each question to take you deeper into your beliefs. Like all true things, once you hit upon the block(s) you have around this issue, it will resonate in your body and healing can begin.



NOTE: If you find yourself overwhelmed and in need of support, reach out to a trusted friend, coach, or therapist.



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